Tag Archives: gdk

Google Glass Development Kit Sneak Peek Revision 2 – List of Some API Changes

I came across lots of problems when the glass updated to XE12, long ago. Today I found out this article which I thought I would like to share with you all.

My Glass was automatically updated with the monthly update XE12. This update included a new version of GDK implementation, known as Sneak Peek Rev. 2.

Since the update, I could not run any of my GDK sample apps. I was getting errors like: java.lang.NoSuchMethodError: com.google.android.glass.timeline.TimelineManager.getLiveCard.

As it turned out, this new GDK revision included some non-backward compatible API changes. Clearly, names like “Sneak Peak” or “Preview” edition imply they are not stable releases, and APIs can change any time. But, I was caught a bit off-guard, and a bit disappointed since it happened “without warnings”. (Or, maybe there was a pre-announcement, and I may have missed it because I’m off-line most of the time these days.) I mentioned the importance of “backward compatibility” in software engineering a few times before. Even more importantly, I believe that software engineers should strive for “forward compatibility”. This is a difficult goal to attain because, in many cases, developers do not know what product features they will need to support in the future. In most organizations, they come down from “PM’s” or people from “higher up”. Nonetheless, I think it is possible, and it is worth pursuing.

Anyways, I went through all my sample apps on GDK Demo and updated the code based on the new API. I’ll include the list of API changes here. This is only a partial list since the GDK Demo apps use only a subset of the GDK APIs.

First, you’ll need to update your GDK using Android SDK Manager. Since the original GDK release about a month ago, there seems to have been no other Android updates. When I opened the SDK Manager last night, it found only one update, GDK rev. 2. You can copy the updated gdk.jar file into your project dir and include it in your build path, or you can just set your compileSdkVersion to a GDK-specific string. I personally prefer the first approach because there are some benefits of using a higher version for compileSdkVersion than that of targetSdkVersion (which should be 15 at this point). If you plan to do any “cross-platform” development (e.g., your app targeting both Android phones and Google Glass), then you probably have no choice but to use the Jar file.

So, here’s the list of API changes in GDK (as relevant to the currently “released” GDK Demo apps).

  • TimelineManager: Method name change from getLiveCard(cardId) to createLiveCard(cardTag). (I’m only presuming that these are the same method, and the API change entails only the name change.)
  • LiveCard: It appears that the method setNonSilent(boolean) has been removed. Instead, this “nonsllent” flag is set during publishing. The signature of the method publish() with setNonSilent(true) has been changed to publish(LiveCard.PublishMode.REVEAL). If you used setNonSilent(false) for your livecard, then you now need to call publish(LiveCard.PublishMode.SILENT) instead.
  • LiveCard.enableDirectRendering(boolean) has been changed to setDirectRenderingEnabled(boolean).
  • com.google.android.glass.media.Camera has been, it appears, renamed to CameraManager.
  • The surface rendering callback interface, LiveCardCallback seems to have been renamed as DirectRenderingCallback. My existing code just compiled fine (haven’t tried running them all though) after only changing the interface name.

That’s about it. Again, this is only a partial list of API changes in the new “Revision 2” version of GDK (as relevant to the “GDK Demo” sample Glassware). I haven’t done any comprehensive comparison of old vs. new GDK jar files or anything like that (which is probably easy to do). Google might have posted some kind of “release note” or “change log” at this point (which I haven’t seen yet though).

Meanwhile, I hope other GDK developers find my list useful, for now.

PS 1: BTW, interface name changes like LiveCardCallback -> DirectRenderingCallback possibly imply that there might be something coming in the future that are in some way equivalent/similar to LiveCard (maybe, DeadCard? :)). This is known as “breaking backward compatibility for forward compatibility”. We developers do this all the time, whether we realize it or not. We create, say, a class for certain purpose (with a certain name), and later realize that we have chosen too specific a name because the class can be more broadly applicable than initially planned.

Reference – http://blog.glassdiary.com/post/70419002255/google-glass-development-kit-sneak-peek-revision-2

Link to the GDK Release note – The GDK release note page.

Advertisements

What comes with the new Google GLASS Development Kit?

The GDK is an Android SDK add-on that contains APIs for Glass-specific features.
sdk-gdk

Unlike the Mirror API, Glassware built with the GDK runs on Glass itself, allowing access to low-level hardware features.

At the time of writing this article Sample GDK has been released out introducing ways to develop native android apps for Google Glass.

gdk-glassware-android

So what does the new GDK brings

1. A new platform for you to develop your GLASS apps so it will have special libraries needed to for the Google GLASS. Not all are available yet, you have to wait for the final version to come.

2.Touch Gestures – Accessing raw data from the Glass touchpad is possible with the Android SDK. However, the GDK provides a gesture detector designed for the Glass touchpad that automatically detects common gestures on Glass, including tapping, swiping, and scrolling. Click Here for detailed info on developing

3.Voice Input – Voice is an integral part in a hands-free experience for users. Glass lets you declare voice triggers to launch your Glassware from the ok glass voice menu. Click Here for detailed info on developing

4.Location and Sensors – You access location and sensor data using the standard Android platform APIs. You have to access the paired device for location and there is another way of gettin location without the help of paired device. It is taken based on the Wifi hotspot, but it wont be accurate as much as the location taken fron the paired device’s gps. Click Here for detailed info on developing

5.Camera – You can use the Glass camera to capture images and video and to also display the camera’s preview stream for a variety of different use cases. Click Here for detailed info on developing

Reference : Site Name – Glass Development KIT, Url – https://developers.google.com/glass/develop/gdk/index, Date 5th December 2013, Time – 12.13pm (GMT +5.30)

All What you need to know before start developing for Google Glass (Infographic)

google_glass_dev_kinvey

Ok then, In my next post we will see how to install Google Glass Software in our Android Phone without rooting the phone(So in future till we get a proper emulator we can use it)…!

Info graphic Image Source : http://readwrite.com/2013/05/30/everything-you-need-to-know-to-get-started-with-google-glass-development